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Cigar Review: Who Are You ?

Every cigar has its advocate or distractor. Cuban cigar fanciers often can see nothing wrong with any cigar from the Isle. Others are more inclined to have an open mind on cigars from all areas. I like Cuban cigars and generally find them a great smoke and highly recommend them. Still , not every cigar is a total winner. Here are my thoughts on this particular cigar, read my review and then make your own judgment. How and where I receive the cigar does not influence my way of thinking.

Brand/Name of Cigar: Romeo Y Julietta Short Churchill

Country of Origin: Cuba

Size: 55 x 51

Shape: Short Churchill

Where and When smoked: Lone Wolf Cigar Lounge, 7/8/17 Los Angeles , Ca.

Appearance/Construction:

An attractive combo of a light brown wrapper, slightly tight to the touch with a gentle oily feel. No obvious issues with veins or other defects. It’s a very clean-looking smoke with a striking cigar band.

Flavor/ Taste and Aroma:

The first third came across of a combination of bitter chocolate, coffee, earthy infusion of grass. Spice was present was not of any consequence. Medium to full, fairly smooth and consistent.

Smoking Characteristics:

There was an uneven burn during the second third and a re light. Was surprised at this as the construction looked very solid. The flavor also grew more spicy with a black pepper dominance. I started to feel the effects of the spice hit and got somewhat overwhelmed. The chocolate was still around. I should have eaten a meal before smoking this cigar.

This smoke became a juggernaut of strength and dominance as I smoked. A word to the wise: Eat something solid before you take on this blend. Prepare for a full onslaught of power. The cigar was not to blame for this. It was my lack of good judgment.  The uneven burn was an issue but not overwhelming to the cigar.

Final thoughts and the numbers:

This was a cigar of full strength and I was not thinking correctly on my prep. Keep this in mind as I would recommend this short Churchill to a hearty smoker but not to a novice. The potential to getting your ass kicked from smoking is a real possibility. Buy a couple for your humidor but eat before you undertake this blend.

Appearance/Construction:  3.8 out of 5

Flavor/Taste and Aroma: 3.8 out of 5

Smoking Characteristics: 3.5 out of 5

Conclusion/Overall Impression: 3.6 out of 5

*Credit: Frank Gerechter, The Urban Fishing Pole Cigars

A Cigar With Good Vibes

The Romeo y Julieta is a classic looking habano smoke. This is a cigar that needs a good hour, with uninterrupted time in your favorite chair. I smoked it on a pleasant cooler Los Angeles afternoon. Impressive looking with an attractive wrapper with an oily feel. Let’s do it and smoke away.

130 mm, ring gauge 55 : Habano
It started with creamy note of chocolate and almonds. Very smooth and flavorful but I expected a more spicy start. Very easy draw, medium in scope, not much heat.
After the first third still very smooth and the nutty profile hangs with us. Medium with perhaps a slight pepper aftertaste.
As we approach the end of the smoke, the burn becomes uneven which impact the appearance for sure.
It also got somewhat bitter which knocked the overall experience down a peg.
Final thoughts:
Overall a top flight smoke with a couple of minor imperfections . Here are my final numbers and rating.
Appearance and construction :  4.0 out of 5
Flavor, taste and aroma:  4 out of 5
Overall impression: 4 out of 5
If this smoke is available grab it.

Stellar Stogies: Romeo y Julieta

The “Romeo y Julieta” above obviously refers to the famous Cuban cigar brand, not its unremarkable Dominican namesake. The brand is, of course, named after the star-crossed lovers of Shakespeare’s most famous play. Which I often take to mean that I should smoke a pair of them. I’m just romantic that way.

Romeo y Julieta Cigars was established in Cuba in 1875. And while it took awhile for Romeo y Julieta to become the worldwide star of the cigar industry it is today, the brand did win quite a few high-level cigar awards in its infancy. Among them were gold medals from exhibitions in Antwerp, Paris, and Brussels. Ever wondered about the gold medals on Romeo y Julieta bands? That’s where they came from.

The brand transformed into the Romeo y Julieta we would recognize today when it was purchased by the firm Rodriguez, Argüelles y Cia in 1903. The head of the company, Jose Rodriguez, really knew what he was doing when he decided to acquire the brand: he was formerly in charge of Havana’s famous Cabañas factory. He wanted to take a good brand and make it great. And he certainly did.

Though quality was always important to the brand, Rodriguez (who soon became sole owner of “Romeo y Julieta Cigar Factory”) was a sharp guy – he also knew how important increased production and great marketing would be to the success of the brand. So he started off by implementing a system of incentives that would increase the quantity of cigars the workers could produce. A very modern idea.

Rodriguez was a modern guy, and also used plenty of modern marketing techniques to get the brand name out there. A smooth salesman, he traveled the world marketing his cigars. He pulled lots of gimmicky (but very successful) marketing stunts, such as entering his racehorse (named, of course, Julieta) in races worldwide to bring attention to his cigars. Or making a public spectacle of opening up a Romeo y Julieta cigar shop in the Hotel Capulet in Verona, Italy. And if these place names don’t sound familiar to you (and hence you don’t get the gimmick), you need to go re-read your Shakespeare.

Because of Rodriguez’s smooth schmoozing, the brand exploded, becoming one of the most popular in the world. Just to keep things going, he began to offer personalized bands for the brand’s steady customers. At one point, 2000 different personalized bands were being made for the brand’s more affluent and famous patrons.

One of these famous patrons was, of course, good ol’ Winston Churchill. He was such a big fan of the brand that Romeo y Julieta is given credit for creating the “Churchill” shape that’s so popular today (the factory name is Julieta 2).

*Credit: Karen, Cigar Inspector

*Photo credits: Kevin Hammond, Miss Cleopatra

2017 Habanos S.A. Release List Leaks

It’s August and once the Habanos S.A. release list for the proceeding year has leaked.

The Brazilian website Conexão Tabaco has posted the list, which includes a handful of Montecristo additions amongst others.

According to Conexão Tabacothe 2017 releases are:

Duty Free Exclusives

  • Hoyo de Monterrey Petit Belicoso — 4 11/12 (125mm) x 52 — Boxes of 15

Edición Limitada 2017

  • Cohiba Talisman — 6 1/12 (154mm) X 54 — Boxes of 10
  • Partagás Serie No.1 — 5 5/12 (138mm) x 52 — Boxes of 25
  • Punch Regios de Punch — 4 3/4 (120mm) x 48 — Boxes of 25

Gran Reserva

  • H.Upmann Sir Winston — 7 (178mm) x 47 — 5,000 Boxes of 15

La Casa del Habano Exclusives

  • H.Upmann Connoisseur B — 5 11/12 (150mm) x 54 — Boxes of 25
  • Trinidad La Trova — 6 1/2 (166mm) x 52 — Boxes of 12

Regular Production

  • Montecristo Dumas — 5 1/8 (130mm) x 49 — Boxes of 20
  • Montecristo Leyenda — 6 1/2 (165mm) x 55 — Boxes of 20
  • Montecristo Maltes — 6 (153mm) x 53 — Boxes of 20
  • Romeo y Julieta Petit Royales — 3 3/4 (95mm) x 47 — Boxes of 20; Packs of 3
  • Quai D’Orsay Alma — 5 3/10 (135mm) x 54 — Boxes of 10; Boxes of 25
  • Quai D’Orsay Gourmet — 4 1/3 (110mm) x 50 — Boxes of 10; Boxes of 25
  • Quintero Favoritos — 4 1/2 (115mm) x 50 — Packs of 3

Special Release

  • Bolivar Mundiales — 6 1/3 (160mm) x 56 — Humidors of 115
  • El Rey del Mundo Imperio — 7 1/11 (180mm) x 54 — Humidors of 50
While the information has not been confirmed by Habanos S.A., over the past few years leaks around this time have proven to be highly accurate.
*Credit: Charlie Minato, Halfwheel